JTCO strives for inheritance, creation and development of Japanese traditional culture.

JTCOJapanese Traditional Culture Promotion&Development Organization
日本語 | English
 October, 2019
 September, 2019
 July, 2019
 June, 2019
 May, 2019
 April, 2019
 March, 2019
 January, 2019
 December, 2018
 November, 2018
 October, 2018
 August, 2018
 July, 2018
 June, 2018
 May, 2018
 March, 2018
 February, 2018
 January, 2018
 November, 2017
 October, 2017
 September, 2017
 August, 2017
 July, 2017
 June, 2017
 May, 2017
 April, 2017
 March, 2017
 February, 2017
 January, 2017
 December, 2016
 November, 2016
 October, 2016
 August, 2016
 July, 2016
 June, 2016
 May, 2016
 April, 2016
 March, 2016
 February, 2016
 January, 2016
 December, 2015
 November, 2015
 October, 2015
 September, 2015
 August, 2015
 July, 2015
 June, 2015
 May, 2015
 April, 2015
 March, 2015
 February, 2015
 January, 2015
 December, 2014
 November, 2014
 October, 2014
 September, 2014
 August, 2014
 July, 2014
 May, 2014
 March, 2014
 January, 2014
 December, 2013
 November, 2013
 October, 2013
 September, 2013
 0,

Inden craftsman interview report

July 20, 2014

The city of Kofu flourished as the capital where the family of Takeda was based. Takeda was the warlord during the Sengoku period in the 15th century (also known as the Warring States period.) The name of Kofu was given by Nobutora Takeda, the father of Shingen Takeda, and designated Kofu as "the regional capital of Kai Province." A castle town was formed in Kofu as the base of Shingen during the Sengoku period, and Kofu went on to become prosperous in the early modern period as the center of business, as an important Western defense position for Edo and as a post-town along Koshu-Kaido which was a route connecting Edo and Kai Province.

"The Chronicles of Japan", the second oldest book of Japanese history, says that artifacts made with deer skin were brought to Japan around the end of the 5th century by leather craftsmen from Goryeo, one of the ancient Three Kingdoms of Korea. Today it is the oldest leather craft in Japan. It was not until the middle of the Edo period that Inden came to be made in its modern way by drawing designs on deer leather using lacquer. Even so, deer leather crafts saw great advancements in the time of the development of samurai society and amidst war disturbances, since the supple and light but sturdy characteristics of deer skin were valued as a material suitable for armor and harnesses. Today, we can still see a bag called "Shingen-bukuro" (Shingen bag). One theory states that the name originates from the bag made of deer leather that samurai generals used to hold their armor.

Read the full article:
The Miniature of Lacquered Deer Leather: Koshu-Inden


JTCO Newsletter "Delivery of Seasonal Tradition"Experience Japan with you tour guide!Find us@Facebook